Mincemeat Flapjacks – Low Sugar

Welcome a festive twist on a classic treat, Low Sugar Mincemeat Flapjacks! These delectable oat bars brings together buttery oats with the rich and spiced flavours of mincemeat. The perfect diabetic-friendly sweet treat for the holiday season and beyond 


mincemeat flapjacks on a cooling tray


British flapjacks, a beloved snack across the UK, hold a nostalgic charm in their classic form. However, what better way to enjoy these treats than with a little added festive charm? These festive flapjacks are infused with a sumptuous layer of my Homemade Mincemeat, making them perfect for the holiday season and beyond!

In this Mincemeat Flapjack recipe, lusciously buttery oats meld with crunchy nuts, layered with a delicately spiced mincemeat. The best part? These mouthwatering oat bars are not only a festive delight but also boast a low sugar content and are gluten-free, making them a thoughtful choice for those mindful of diabetes management.

Within this article, I’ll guide you through crafting the finest Mincemeat Flapjack—from choosing the best oats to creating a delectable sugar-free mincemeat. You’ll find a step-by-step guide to fashioning these festive treats, unravelling the reasons why these oat bars stand out as excellent snacking options for diabetes management during the holiday season and beyond.


mincemeat flapjacks

What are Low Sugar Mincemeat flapjacks?


These mincemeat flapjacks are a delightful twist on traditional flapjack, by bringing together 2 of my favourite sweet treats; flapjacks and mince pies. The rich and spiced flavours of mincemeat, which you would typically find in a mince pie, have been combined with buttery oats to make a sensational Christmas treat.

But the best thing about this recipe is that it has been created with diabetes management in mind which can be even harder during periods like Christmas and Thanksgiving. The oats and sugar substitute, xylitol, used in this recipe, both have a low GI which will work with the fruit to help minimise dramatic blood sugar spikes.

Crafting diabetic-friendly treats is just one of the ways we approach managing diabetes over the holiday season. https://www.wholeheartykitchen.co.uk/christmas-and-managing-type-1-diabetes/read the article below for more helpful tips:

CHRISTMAS AND TYPE 1 DIABETES

The prospect of navigating Christmas while managing diabetes might initially seem daunting. Nevertheless, it doesn’t have to be. With careful planning and consideration, managing your diabetes doesn’t have to overshadow the joy of the holiday season!


What are the Best Oats to use for Flapjacks?

There are a lot of different names out there for oats or oatmeal such as

  • Porridge oats
  • Jumbo oats
  • Rolled oats
  • Scottish Oats
  • Old fashioned oats
  • Instant/ Ready oats

You might be thinking that all oats are the same, but that’s not the case. The processing of oats varies, leading to differences in texture when cooked and how our bodies respond to them.

In experimenting with oats for this Mincemeat Flapjack recipe, I’ve discovered that using slightly smaller porridge oats yields the best results. Their smaller surface area and quicker cooking time make them ideal for absorbing the wonderfully buttery sugar-free syrup. The added bonus is that the smaller porridge oats also tend to be a bit more budget-friendly—a win-win!


What Mincemeat to use?

For this Mincemeat Flapjack recipe, the preferred choice is to use my homemade mincemeat. The absence of suet and added sugar in this mincemeat recipe not only aligns with dietary preferences but I think also enhances the overall texture and flavour of these flapjacks.

The homemade touch also adds a unique, personal twist to the recipe, ensuring a delightful fusion of spiced, fruity goodness with every bite.

Jar of svegan mincemeat with a spoon

However, for ease, you can also use a shop-bought jar if you are looking for a more convenient option. But make sure to read the labels and adjust the carb counting accordingly.


Why a Mincemeat Flapjack Makes a Delicious diabetic-friendly Christmas Snack

The main ingredient in this recipe is Oats. Oats are versatile whole grains that offer various health benefits. One of which is that they can aid blood sugar regulation. Oats are fibrous and have a low glycemic index. This means that your body will be slower in turning the carbohydrate to glucose, resulting in a more delayed and potentially smaller rise in blood sugar levels.

Low-GI foods like oats can really help support your overall diabetes management plan. They can help keep blood sugars more in range and avoid long hyper episodes which can be draining. But if you would like to read more about some both the other tools on our diabetes toolkit then make sure to read the article below:

picture of friends supporting each other

Our Diabetes Management Toolkit

Living with and/or caring for a person with type 1 diabetes is demanding, which is why it’s so important to create a diabetes management toolkit that can help you every day.


This flapjack recipe goes even further though by replacing the usual brown sugar and golden syrup with a sugar alternative, xylitol. Xylitol is my sweetener of choice due to its:

  • low glycaemic index,
  • doesn’t have a strange taste profile
  • doesn’t cause a rise in blood sugar levels

Using sugar substitutes can be another great tool in supporting your diabetes management but they can be confusing, so make sure to read my article to help you navigate the options!

Nevertheless, I appreciate what works for us may not be the same for you. However, through trial and (lots of) error, we know that choosing low GI options, such as oats and sugar alternatives has their place in helping keep our daughter’s blood sugars in range for longer.

stack of mincemeat flapjacks


Ingredients for Low Sugar Mincemeat flapjacks

Oats

  • A naturally gluten-free whole grain – It is in the processing that contamination with gluten/wheat may occur
  • Oats are such a magnificent food; they are wholegrain, a great complex carbohydrate source, and full of fibre, essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.
  • They also have a lower glycaemic index so your body will be slower in digesting them and therefore turning the carbs into sugar.

Butter

  • High in saturated fat so I am always careful not to include too much in our diets
  • I use unsalted

Xylitol

  • A nutritive-based sweetener with a low glycaemic index that doesn’t cause a rise in blood sugars
  • Use any sweetener you prefer, however, read more here, as not all sugar replacements are a 1:1 substitute.
  • You can find a list of my recommended products that I use on my shop page!

Mincemeat

  • I use a fruity homemade mincemeat without suet or added sugar, which is suitable for vegetarians and vegans.
  • You can also use a jar of shop-bought mincemeat

Chopped Nuts (optional)

  • I love to add chopped nuts on top of the flapjacks for an extra nuttiness and crunch

Equipment

1 square tin 20cm x 20cm

Parchment / Baking paper

Weighing scales

Spatula

Saucepan


How to make Mincemeat Flapjacks

A flapjack recipe is typically quite simple. They are generally pretty sweet, buttery and either soft and chewy or a little harder and crumbly. These low sugar flapjacks tend to be a little more on the crumbly side due to the addition of the mincemeat.

Read on for your step-by-step guide on how to make the perfect batch of Mincemeat Flapjacks:

Step 1

Make the Flapjacks – Start by preheating your oven to 180c fan / 200c and then prepare your tin. Line a square tin (20cm x 20cm) with parchment paper so that the paper comes up on all sides.

butter and xylitol in a saucepan

Step 2

In a saucepan heat the butter and xylitol until bubbling. Turn the heat down and leave to simmer for a couple of minutes.

bowl of oats mixed with melted butter and xylitol

Step 3

Take the buttery mixture off the heat and add to the oats. Mix everything together, ensuring all your oats are beautifully covered.

a layer of oats in a square cake tin

Step 4

Transfer half of the oaty mixture to the lined tin, spreading it out evenly. Push down firmly with a spoon or you can lay a piece of grease-proof paper on top and use your hands to press down firmly to get the flapjacks nice and smooth.

a layer of mincemeat spread over a layer of oats

Step 5

Now spread your mincemeat all over the base of the oats evenly

uncooked mincemeat flapjacks showing the top oat layer being added

Step 6

Add the remaining half of your oats on top. Again make sure to press down firmly.

Sprinkle with the chopped nuts if you are using them and then pop the flapjacks into the preheated oven for 35 – 40 mins. The flapjacks should have a light golden glow to them.

mincemeat flapjacks uncut in the cake tin

Step 7

Leave the flapjacks to completely cool in the tin before removing carefully, by lifting the parchment paper.

I would recommend leaving them to cool again in the fridge before cutting them into your squares.


Storing your flapjacks

Store your flapjacks in an airtight container at room temperature for up to a week


Diabetes Note

The oats and sugar substitute, xylitol, used in this recipe, both have a low GI which will work with the fruit to help minimise dramatic blood sugar spikes.

Carb Counting

The overall carb count for one flapjack, based on the ingredients we would count for is:

  • 400g Homemade Mincemeat = 154g of carbs
  • 400g of Porridge Oats from Sainsbury’s = 242g of carbs

Now add all the carbs together – 154+242 = 396g

Divide this by the serving size, 16 – 396/16 = 25g of carb per flapjack

Please note this carb count amount per portion is based on the standard ingredients listed above and may differ depending on what you use and how much you choose to eat.

If you enjoyed this article then leave a star rating and comment below. I would love to hear from you!

Don’t forget you can also FOLLOW ME on Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest. Click below to connect with me

Mincemeat Flapjacks

Mincemeat Flapjacks

Recipe by Michelle


Experience the deliciousness of mincemeat in every bite with these low-sugar flapjacks. These diabetic friendly festive treats are a delicious choice for your snacking pleasure

Course: Sweet TreatsCuisine: BritishDifficulty: Easy
5.0 from 1 vote
Servings

16

servings
Prep time

10

minutes
Cooking time

35

minutes
Resting Time

4-5 hours

Total time

45

minutes
Cook Mode

Keep the screen of your device on

Ingredients

  • 250 g 250 butter

  • 100 g 100 xylitol

  • 400 g 400 small rolled oats

  • 400 g 400 mincemeat

  • 100 g 100 chopped nuts

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 180c fan / 200c and then prepare your tin. Line a square tin (20cm x 20cm) with parchment paper so that the paper comes up on all sides.
  • In a saucepan heat the butter and xylitol until bubbling. Turn the heat down and leave to simmer for a couple of minutes.
  • Take the buttery mixture off the heat and add to the oats. Mix everything together, ensuring all your oats are beautifully covered.
  • Transfer half of the oaty mixture to the lined tin, spreading it out evenly. Push down firmly with a spoon or you can lay a piece of grease-proof paper on top and use your hands to press down firmly to get the flapjacks nice and smooth
  • Now spread your mincemeat all over the base of the oats evenly
  • Add the remaining half of your oats on top. Again make sure to press down firmly.
  • Sprinkle with the chopped nuts if you are using them and then pop the flapjacks into the preheated oven for 35 – 40 mins. The flapjacks should have a light golden glow to them.
  • Leave the flapjacks to completely cool in the tin before removing carefully, by lifting the parchment paper.
    I would recommend leaving them to cool again in the fridge before cutting them into your squares.
  • Then using a sharp knife cut the flapjacks into 16 equal squares.

Equipment

Tips and Notes

  • Use the smaller rolled oats as they seem to stick together better for this recipe
  • As hard as it is, leave these flapjacks to totally cool before cutting to avoid crumbling squares. I like to put the flapjacks in the fridge for a couple of hours before cutting.
  • Diabetes Note – The oats and sugar substitute, xylitol, used in this recipe, both have a low GI which will work with the fruit to help minimise dramatic blood sugar spikes.
  • Carb Counting – see notes above
Michelle Rorke avatar

AUTHOR

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *