Easy & Healthy Roasted Bombay Potatoes 

These Easy and Healthy Roasted Bombay potatoes are a fantastic addition to your Indian recipe repertoire. They are perfect as a delicious side for curries or a satisfying vegetarian main course.  Plus, it’s a one-pan recipe, which means minimal cleanup – a win in any busy kitchen!

Bombay potatoes in a bowl

I love recreating my favourite Indian dishes at home. This way, I get all that wonderful flavour I love so much, but in a way, that’s a bit lighter on the oil and a whole lot quicker to make.  And this recipe for Bombay potatoes is one such recipe that does just that. It captures all the lusciousness of normal roasties but with a wonderful Indian twist. Not only are they lighter and healthier but also easier for diabetes management as there is less fat so no prolonged spikes once the insulin has worn off!

This comforting dish is ridiculously delicious, perfect as a side for any Indian curry recipe or my favourite Indian baked salmon, and hearty enough to be a main course on its own. Plus, the best part? It all comes together in one pan, which means minimal cleanup – a lifesaver on those busy weeknights.

The best part? This Indian potato recipe stays true to the flavours of a traditional Bombay potato dish, using simple traditional Indian spices but with healthier methods for cooking:

  • Warm Spices: Aromatic coriander, fenugreek leaves, garam masala, turmeric and chilli form the base of the spice mix
  • Crispy, Not Deep-Fried: traditionally a waxy potato would be used in a Bombay potato recipe. However, for ease, I like to use baby or new potatoes that don’t need to be peeled. These are then cooked using a healthy amount of oil. This method achieves beautiful crispy edges and soft insides
  • Natural Luscious Flavor: Fresh ingredients like lemon juice and a touch of rapeseed oil add brightness and depth to the dish, all while avoiding the need for added sugars or heavy creams.
roasted Bombay potatoes with one spit in half in a bowl

What you will need for  this Easy Bombay Potatoes Recipe

Vegetable oil

  • I like to use cold-pressed rapeseed oil in my recipes where I don’t want the oil to add any flavour
  • Rapeseed (or canola oil) is lower in saturated fat, high in omega 3 fatty acids and healthy fats

Small Baby Potatoes

  • I use baby potatoes which have a thin skin so no need to peel potatoes

Bombay Spice Mix

bombay mixed spice in a dish
  • You can use a pre-made mix of curry powder or alternatively make your own using the spices listed here:
  • Ground Coriander, Turmeric powder, Fenugreek curry leaves, Garam Masala, chilli powder, Salt.

Fresh Coriander, Spring onions & Lemon to serve (optional)

Equipment

Roasting Tray

Measuring Spoon

How to make Roasted Bombay Potatoes

Not only are these Indian potatoes bursting with bags of extra flavour, but they’re also incredibly easy to make—all in one pan in the oven. Here’s how to do it:

Step 1 

Preheat the oven 220c / 200c fan /400°F 

Indian spices in a bowl

Step 2

Make the Bombay spice mix – combine all the spices and salt gently grinding the fenugreek leaves between your fingers to create finer pieces.

Step 3

Wash the baby potatoes thoroughly and pat them dry with a kitchen towel. If the potatoes are larger, consider halving them for faster cooking.

uncooked Bombay potatoes

Step 4

In the baking tray add the potatoes and oil and mix them well. This step ensures that the spices adhere well to the potatoes during roasting.

Sprinkle over the Bombay spices and mix everything well making sure to coat each one generously. Feel free to adjust the amount of spice mix according to your taste preferences and make sure you have a single layer of potatoes to ensure that they roast evenly.

Roasted bombay potatoes in a roasting tray

Step 5

Place the baking tray of coated potatoes into the preheated oven for 30-40 minutes, or until they are golden brown and tender when pierced with a fork.

Step 6

Once done, remove the potatoes from the oven and let them cool slightly before serving. Garnish with fresh herbs like coriander or parsley and chopped spring onions for a pop of colour and a squeeze of lemon for extra freshness.

Serving Suggestions

Now that your Roasted Bombay Potatoes are ready, it’s time to plate up and enjoy! This recipe is a great side dish for your Indian meals but it is also incredibly versatile so here are a few other ideas of how you can enjoy these delicious potatoes:

  • Spicy Indian Potatoes: Want it extra fiery? Add a pinch of cayenne pepper, chopped green chilli or extra red chilli powder into the Bombay spice mix.
  • Type of potatoes: Change the potatoes for a more traditional feel to the recipe. Use waxy potatoes or my favourite for the king of roast potatoes, Maris piper potatoes
  • Add some Protein: Looking to make this a more complete Indian meal then add some chickpeas or tofu for a heartier protein boost.
  • Serve with Salad: serve the potatoes alongside a vibrant salad filled with leafy greens, crunchy vegetables, and a zesty vinaigrette. This adds freshness and texture to your plate
  • Indian Street Food Vibes: Serve the Bombay potatoes on Naan bread with a bed of fresh coriander leaves, a squeeze of lime juice and a dollop of cooling yoghurt for a true street food experience.
  • For a cosy dinner option: Enjoy the potatoes with a homemade curry, or my favourite Indian Baked Salmon for a tasty midweek or weekend dinner.

Can you reheat Bombay Potatoes?


Yes, you can reheat Bombay potatoes! Here’s a simple guide to help you do it effectively:

  1. Oven Method: Preheat your oven to 175°C / 160 fan / 350°F 
    Place the leftover Bombay potatoes on a baking sheet. Spread them out in a single layer to ensure even reheating. Bake in the preheated oven for about 10-15 minutes, or until they are heated through. Keep an eye on them to prevent overcooking.
  2. Pan Method: Heat a non-stick skillet or frying pan over medium heat. Add a small amount of vegetable oil or cooking spray to the pan. Once the pan is hot, add the leftover Bombay potatoes and spread them out evenly. Cook for 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are heated through and crispy on the outside.
  3. Microwave Method: Place the leftover Bombay potatoes in a microwave-safe dish. Cover the dish with a microwave-safe lid or microwave-safe plastic wrap, leaving a small vent to allow steam to escape. Microwave on high for 1-2 minutes, or until the potatoes are heated through. Stir halfway through the heating time for more even reheating.
  4. Air Fryer Method: Preheat your air fryer to 350°F (175°C). Place the leftover Bombay potatoes in the air fryer basket in a single layer. Air fry for 5-7 minutes, shaking the basket halfway through, until the potatoes are heated through and crispy. Adjust the cooking time as needed based on the size and quantity of the potatoes.

Diabetes Note

These Bombay potatoes are prepared with whole, nutrient-rich ingredients, making them a healthy choice for individuals with diabetes. The baby potatoes provide complex carbohydrates, which are digested more slowly, resulting in a gradual rise in blood sugar levels. Additionally, the use of a homemade Bombay spice mix allows us to control the amount of salt and remove added sugar to this dish, again promoting better blood sugar control.

Carb Counting

To carb count the Roasted Bombay Potatoes recipe, you’ll need to calculate the total carbohydrates based on the ingredients used. Here’s a breakdown of how to do it:

Baby Potatoes: The carbohydrate content of potatoes can vary depending on their size and variety. On average, a medium-sized baby potato (about 2 inches in diameter) contains approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. You’ll need to weigh the total amount of baby potatoes used in the recipe and calculate the total carbohydrates accordingly.

1 kg of raw baby potatoes = 161g of carbs

This dish serves 4 so a single portion would be 161/4 = 40g of carbs

However, for a more accurate carb count use the formula below, making sure to use the total weight minus the baking tray weight:

infographic of the diabetic carb counting formula

See my Mastering Carb Counting Guide for detailed examples

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Easy & Healthy Roasted Bombay Potatoes 

Easy & Healthy Roasted Bombay Potatoes 

Recipe by Michelle

A Healthy & Easy Roasted Bombay Potatoes recipe! These delicious one-pan wonders are full of whole-food goodness.

Course: SidesCuisine: British IndianDifficulty: Very Easy
5.0 from 1 vote
Servings

4

servings
Prep time

5

minutes
Cooking time

30

minutes
Total time

35

minutes
Cook Mode

Keep the screen of your device on

Ingredients

  • 1 kg 1 baby potatoes

  • 2 tbsp 2 cold pressed rapeseed oil

  • For the Bombay Spice Mix
  • 2 tsp 2 ground coriander

  • 1 tsp 1 turmeric

  • 1 tsp 1 garam masala

  • 1 tsp 1 fenugreek leaves

  • 1/2 tsp 1/2 chilli powder

  • 1/2 tsp 1/2 salt

Directions

  • Preheat the oven 220c / 200c fan /400°F 
  • Make the Bombay spice mix – combine all the spices and salt gently grinding the fenugreek leaves between your fingers to create finer pieces.
  • Wash the baby potatoes thoroughly and pat them dry with a kitchen towel. If the potatoes are larger, consider halving them for faster cooking.
  • In the baking tray add the potatoes and oil and mix them well. This step ensures that the spices adhere well to the potatoes during roasting.
  • Sprinkle over the Bombay spices and mix everything well making sure to coat each potato.
    Feel free to adjust the amount of spice mix according to your taste preferences and make sure you have a single layer of potatoes to ensure that they roast evenly.
  • Place the baking tray of coated potatoes into the preheated oven for 30-40 minutes, or until they are golden brown and tender when pierced with a fork.
  • Once done, remove the potatoes from the oven and let them cool slightly before serving.
    Optional – Garnish with fresh herbs like coriander or parsley and chopped spring onions for a pop of colour and a squeeze of lemon for extra freshness.

Equipment

Tips and Notes

  • Diabetes Note – The baby potatoes provide complex carbohydrates, which are digested more slowly, resulting in a gradual rise in blood sugar levels. See above for Carb Counting Information
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