Simple Sugar Free Oat Biscuits

These super simple sugar free oat biscuits are so quick and easy to make and are healthier and kinder on blood sugar levels. They make a great snack and are totally versatile so you can get as creative as you like in the kitchen!


stacked sugar free oat cookies

You only need 6 ingredients for these sugar-free oat biscuits and you can make them all in one bowl. So in under 20 minutes, you can enjoy a nutritious and healthy sweet biscuit.

These oat biscuits make the perfect snack any time of the day and are great to take with you when you are on the go as they are a little sturdier than my QUICK ALMOND BISCUITS and a little lighter than my EASY SUGAR FREE FLAPJACKS. But even better this recipe is so versatile that you could add any extras in before baking, like dried or fresh fruit, nuts, seeds, and different flavours, the choices are endless. Read on for some of my favourite additions and suggestions.


sugar free oat biscuits in a dish

Are Oat Biscuits Healthy?

Oat Biscuits can be a healthier choice in comparison to some of the biscuits that are readily available in the shops. Not only do oat biscuits have a higher fibre content but they also have the added benefit of extra vitamins and minerals. And this biscuit recipe in particular doesn’t contain any added sugar which again makes them a healthier option to help reduce blood sugar spikes.

Why you should try this sugar free oat biscuit recipe

Quick and Easy – Firstly you can’t argue with a biscuit recipe that only takes 20 minutes to make and bake! You only need 6 ingredients, they can be made all in one bowl and you are left with a delicious tasty snack.

Super satisfying – Oat biscuits are super satisfying as they are nutrient-rich and full of fibre. This will help you to feel fuller for longer as well as being a tasty way to get some more good stuff into your diet.

Kinder on blood sugar levels – The combination of the low glycaemic index oats, fat from the butter and ingredients also provide a healthy source of fats which work alongside the fibrous oats to slow the release of glucose which we have found helps to make these sweet treats kinder on blood sugar levels.


sugar free oat biscuits on a cooling rack

Oats vs Oatmeal

Basically, Oats and oatmeal are the same things but we just use different words to describe them. Here are some other terms you may be familiar with:

  • Porridge
  • Porridge oats
  • Rolled oats
  • Jumbo oats
  • Instant oats (the most highly processed version of oats)

Oats start off as oat groats which essentially are the wholegrain. They are the kernels of oats that have had minimal processing. However, we are probably more used to seeing the oat flakes which are essentially the result of the groats being milled and rolled.


stacked sugar free oat cookies in a dish

Are oatmeal cookies OK for diabetics?

Oats have a low glycemic index which can be a really good choice for blood sugar management. Being a low GI whole grain means that your body will be slower in turning the carbohydrate to glucose resulting in a more delayed and potentially smaller rise in blood sugar levels. Another reason why we are big fans of them!

This Oat biscuit recipe goes even further though by replacing the usual sugar with a sugar alternative, xylitol. Xylitol is my sweetener of choice due to its low glycaemic index, it doesn’t have a strange taste profile and it doesn’t cause a rise in blood sugar levels. You can read more about different sugar substitutes in the article below.

Sugar Substitutes and Diabetes Management

The world of sugar substitutes and type 1 diabetes can be confusing. This guide explores substitutes in the UK and diabetes management

Nevertheless, I know what works for us may not be the same for you and I understand that everyone has a unique experience with oats and blood sugar levels. I would never say never and encourage you to give oats a go (maybe again). Through trial and error, having a clear view of levels and patterns thanks to a CGM and learning some different bolus strategies, we have found oats to be a really helpful addition to our daughter’s diet.


What you need to make sugar free Oat Biscuits

  • Butter
    • High in saturated fat but it adds that delicious buttery taste to the oat biscuits
    • You could also use coconut oil if you prefer
  • Sugar Replacement
    • I used Xylitol, a 1:1 sugar replacement. But you could use any sweetener of your choice. Just make sure to adjust quantities as the sweetness levels vary between them as I explain here
    • You can find a list of my recommended products that I use on my shop page!
  • Jumbo Oats
    • A gluten-free whole grain
    • Oats are such a magnificent superfood; they are wholegrain, a great carbohydrate source, and full of fibre, essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.
  • Oat flour
    •  A great source of dietary fibre and is higher in protein and healthy fat than most other grains. It also boasts a rich nutritional profile
    • You can find a list of my recommended products that I use on my shop page!
  • Baking powder
    • A key ingredient to help add a little lightness to the biscuits
  • Ground Mixed Spice
    • Adss a warm sweet flavour
  • Dark chocolate (optional)
    • Try and use chocolate that has a cocoa content of 70% or above as this really makes the difference with the overall carb count
    • The higher the cocoa content the lower the sugar

Equipment Needed

Spatula / Mixing spoon

Measuring Spoon

Mixing Bowl

Weighing Scales

Baking Tray

Cooling Rack

Saucepan


How to make sugar free oat biscuits

I played around with a few methods for these biscuits and had a few disasters. But inspired by how I make flapjacks, this was definitely the method that was by far the easiest and quickest to make these tasty biscuits.

Step 1

Start by preheating the oven to 180 C fan / 200 C and in a saucepan melt the butter and xylitol on a low heat. Make sure that it doesn’t boil or burn so gently stir occasionally.

melted butter and xylitol bubbling in a saucepan

Step 2

Once the butter and sugar are melted, simply add in the oats, oat flour, baking powder and mixed spice. Mix everything together until you have a soft dough-like mixture that holds together. If it is still very wet just leave it for a couple of minutes as it will soon firm up as the oats absorb the liquid.

sugar free oat biscuit batter in a bowl

Step 3

Using a round tablespoon (I use the rounded end of the tbsp measuring spoon ), scoop a heaped spoon of mixture and place it on a parchment-lined baking tray, leaving plenty of space between the balls. Do this another 11 times

balls of uncooked oat biscuits on a baking tray

Step 4

Finally, flatten the balls with your fingertips to make a thick round biscuit shape and place them in the oven to bake for 12- 15 minutes. They should have a slight golden colour.

flattened uncooked oat biscuits on a baking tray

Step 5

Leave the biscuits to cool for 10 minutes before transferring them to a cooling rack.

cooked oat biscuits on a baking tray

How to store your oat biscuits

Once completely cooled, store them in an airtight container or a biscuit tin. They will keep happily for a week like this.

But if you want them to last even longer then you can also store them in an airtight container that is kept in the fridge.


stacked sugar free oat biscuits with some half dipped in chocolate

Variations of sugar free oat biscuits to try

As I mentioned this is a very versatile recipe and you could easily add different flavours and ingredients to the biscuit dough before baking.

Here are a few suggestions you could try:

Add

Raisins or Sultanas

Chopped Nuts

Seeds

Chopped Apricots or Dates

Chocolate Chips

Swap the mixed spice for

Vanilla essence

Ground Cinnamon

Ground or Fresh Ginger

Zest of Lemon or Orange

The possibilities are endless so have some fun a get creative. But please let me know what you try in the comments below!


Diabetes Note

Oats are a real superfood in my eyes, full of vitamins, minerals and fibre. They are fantastic as a slow-release carb snack that potentially can reduce blood sugar spikes.

These biscuits are quite easy to carb count and if you want to be super accurate then weigh your dough balls before you put them on the baking tray to ensure an even amount.

Carb Counting

The overall carb count for each individual biscuit (no chocolate) is based on the ingredients we would count for is:

160g of Jumbo Oats (Sainsbury’s) = 112g of carbs

100g of Oat Flour (Wholefoods Online) = 59 g of carbs

Now add all the carbs together – 112+59 = 171g of carbs

Finally divide this by the serving size, 12 – 171/12 = 14g of carb per biscuit

If you add any melted chocolate as I did in the pictures then you would have to add that on to the overall carb count.


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Simple Sugar-Free Oat Biscuits

Simple Sugar-Free Oat Biscuits

Recipe by Michelle Rorke

Easy, healthy and tempting, these sugar-free oatmeal cookies will really hit the snack spot!

Course: Sweet TreatCuisine: BritishDifficulty: Very Easy
4.1 from 11 votes
Servings

12

servings
Prep time

5

minutes
Cooking time

15

minutes
Total time

20

minutes
Cook Mode

Keep the screen of your device on

Ingredients

  • 100 g butter

  • 100 g Xylitol

  • 160 g Jumbo oats

  • 100 g Oat flour

  • 1 tsp baking powder

  • 1 tsp Mixed spice

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 180 C fan / 200 C
  • In a saucepan melt the butter and xylitol on a low heat. Make sure that it doesn’t boil or burn so gently stir occasionally.
  • Once the butter and sugar are melted, simply add in the oats, oat flour, baking powder and mixed spice. Mix everything together until you have a soft dough-like mixture that holds together.
    If it is still very wet just leave it for a couple of minutes as it will soon firm up as the oats absorb the liquid.
  • Using a round tablespoon (I use the rounded end of the tbsp measuring spoon ), scoop a heaped spoon of mixture and place it on a parchment-lined baking tray, leaving plenty of space between the balls. Do this another 11 times.
  • Finally, flatten the balls with your fingertips to make a thick round biscuit shape and place them in the oven to bake for 12- 15 minutes. They should have a slight golden colour.
  • Leave the biscuits to cool for 10 minutes before transferring them to a cooling rack.

Equipment

Tips and Notes

  • If your dough looks too wet just leave it for a couple of minutes as it will soon firm up as the oats absorb the liquid.
  • You may want to use 2 baking trays to make sure your biscuits have plenty of space. Although they don’t spread much when cooking.
  • Diabetes Note – These are fantastic as a slow-release carb snack that potentially helps to reduce blood sugar spikes. These biscuits are quite easy to carb count and if you want to be super accurate then weigh your dough balls before you put them on the baking tray to ensure an even amount. See notes above for more information

Michelle Rorke avatar

AUTHOR

7 responses to “Simple Sugar Free Oat Biscuits”

  1. Jackie avatar

    Tried these today. Mix too dry and would not bind. Ended up adding an egg and milk to make the mix wet enough to bind. Oats seemed to absorb all the butter so think I was too slow mixing dry ingredients to wet!

    1. Michelle Rorke avatar

      Hi Jackie. I am sorry to hear that. I make these biscuits quite regularly and haven’t experienced this problem but a great idea to add an egg and some milk. Thanks Michelle

  2. Charlotte Anglim avatar

    I followed your recipe exactly, taste great. However the mixture was dry and did not bind.
    I went ahead and bakes as specified but it ended up too crumbly. Why? what did i do wrong. FYI this is the first time I tried oat buiscuits.

    1. Michelle avatar

      Hi Charlotte. Firstly thanks for trying the recipe. I really don’t know why they would come out crumbly. I can only think there wasn’t enough wet mixture to bind with the oats and oat flour. However I have not ever expeienced this.
      I have double checked quantities again and the biscuits came out as they should. I will post step by step pictures in the next couple of days so you can see what they look like at each stage.
      Hope this helps
      MIchelle

    2. Michelle avatar

      Hi Charlotte. I have added step-by-step photos under the how to make sugar free oat biscuits section. I hope this helps. Michelle x

  3. Clare Murray avatar

    Lovely, yummy biscuits! Easy recipe to follow. I made a little change by adding less xylitol (60g) as I find this sweet enough for me! And 100g jumbo oats and 60g low sugar grain feee granola (The Paleo Foods Co) Lovely biscuits!

    1. Michelle avatar

      Hi Clare.
      I’m so pleased you liked them and love the idea of adding grain-free granola for a little crunch.

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